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Who is he?  The man who gouged his girlfriend’s eyes out for the fifth time

Shane Jenkin: Who is he?  The man who gouged his girlfriend’s eyes out for the fifth time

CORNWALL, ENGLAND: A man who tried to get out of jail by gouging out his girlfriend’s eyes and rendering her blind was not successful. Shane Jenkin, 42, was advised that he must serve an additional two years in prison following the Parole Board’s decision. His psychiatrist, nurse, and victim Tina Nash all gave testimony, and it was decided that he was still too dangerous to be released.

Nash, who had been permanently blinded as a result of the assault on April 20, 2011, gave a victim impact statement. Jenkin was given a life sentence in prison in 2012 for permanently blinding his partner at her Hayle, Cornwall, home. The night before he attacked Nash, Jenkin watched a video about eye-clawing, according to Truro Crown Court.

Tina suffered horrible injuries as a result of a planned, drawn-out, and brutal assault

According to a Parole Board representative: “We can confirm that after an oral hearing at the end of May of this year, a panel of the Parole Board rejected Shane Jenkins’ parole. Decisions made by the Parole Board are primarily based on the risk that a prisoner might pose to the public upon release and whether that risk can be managed in the community.”

According to the statement, “a panel will meticulously analyze a vast array of information, including specifics of the initial crime and any signs of behavior change, as well as explore the harm done and impact the crime has had on the victims.” “Our top goal is the protection of the general population. He is qualified for another review in due course under the law as it is. The Ministry of Justice will decide when the next evaluation will take place.”

Jenkin received word of the parole review’s conclusion in May. His fifth attempt to have his parole approved failed. He has previously been hospitalized for mental health difficulties and is currently being kept in a high-security facility.

The Parole Board issued the following declaration in writing: “He had recently been a part of a program funded and created by psychologists to assist individuals in identifying and resolving their issues. There were plans for him to switch to a different regime, one that likewise aimed to aid in the identification and resolution of a wide range of complex issues.”

“The panel had heard the results of the psychologist’s evaluation of Mr. Jenkin. The psychologist, Mr. Jenkin’s community probation officer, and the person in charge of his case while he was in custody all suggested that he stay in jail or prison “It was awful. “They were all opposed to transfer to open conditions. The panel determined that Mr. Jenkin was properly detained where elevated risk levels could be managed.”

Nash testified in court in May 2012 that Jenkin assaulted her while she was sleeping at her residence. Despite her cries for aid to call an ambulance, Jenkin held her captive for 12 hours, strangled her to death, and then blinded her. Throughout her four-week hospital stay, she underwent a number of operations, but the physicians were unable to save her eyes.

Nash, who was 32 at the time, expressed to the court her agony at the thought of never seeing her two children again. Her loss of vision was equated to being buried alive.

Jenkin and Nash had viewed a horror movie the night before the terrible assault that included a woman having her eye torn out. The woman was repeatedly held by the throat by Jenkin as he strangled her, leaving her unconscious and occasionally experiencing hallucinations, according to Judge Christopher Clarke.

This wasn’t Jenkin’s first time hitting Nash, though. She acknowledged that she had wanted to change Jenkin’s aggressive tendencies despite his repeated assaults. She did, however, warn other victims of domestic violence to get out as soon as they can.

Additionally, three months prior to allegedly blinding Nash, Jenkin was allegedly charged with parole violation following a sentence for abuse. Due to his violent tendencies, he had also been expelled from the pubs in his area.

The perpetrator of the abuse was given a life term in a mental health facility, with a minimum sentence requirement of six years before being eligible for parole. The Court of Appeal rejected his immediate petition challenging his conviction.

His lawyers contended that if the life sentence was reversed, he might be released once his medical professionals determined that his psychiatric condition had improved. Regardless of his mental condition, the court found Jenkin to be dangerous.

After her dreadful encounter with Jenkin, Tina began speaking out against domestic violence. She wrote a book about the epidemic of domestic abuse and begged other victims to seek help and not keep quiet. Along with sharing her own story, she urged women to escape abusive circumstances “before it’s too late.”

You’re never going to see your kids again, Jenkin threatened as he beat her unconscious and slashed out both of her eyes at her home, according to the author of the book “Out of the Darkness.” During the 12-hour assault, her 3-year-old and 13-year-old boys were sleeping in the same house.

“My eyeball was dangling halfway down my cheek as I sat up and put my palm to my face. I tried to think it was real by touching my slick eyeball. My other eye had a tennis ball-sized swelling, “She composed. It won’t get better; in fact, it’ll grow worse. She hopes that by writing the book, people may be inspired to speak out against violence and have the fortitude to take the required action.

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